Monkeypox symptoms LIVE – How YOU can protect yourself as UK cases soar


THE INITIAL symptons of monkeypox are usually “non-specific” and are like a viral illness, medics say. But it is important to know how to protect yourself as UK cases soar.

Monkeypox presents itself as a chickenpox-type rash that later spreads across parts of the body. The rash usually affects the face, hands and arms, but can spread to genital areas.

Monkeypox is a mild illness which gets better with time, but in order to combat the spread, health chiefs have announced they had procured 20,000 doses of a safe smallpox vaccine called Imvanex, supplied by Bavarian Nordic to contain the infections.

At present, anyone who has been in contact with someone who has caught the infection will be given a dose.

Anyone who has the bug has to isolate and Brits have been told to be aware of the key signs when it comes to infection.

WHO has also advised that anyone who comes into someone who has suspected or confirmed monkeypox must reduce their risk of getting it by limiting contact.

This includes both parties wearing a face mask, avoiding skin-to-skin contact whenever possible, and using disposable gloves if you have any direct contact with lesions.

It is advisable to practice good hand hygiene, especially after coming into contact with infected — or suspected infected —animals or humans.

Regularly clean your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub, especially after contact with the person who is infected, their clothes, bed sheets, towels and other items or surfaces they have touched or that might have come into contact with their rash or respiratory secretions (e.g., utensils, dishes). 

Read our Monkeypox blog below for the latest news and updates…

  • The full list of monkeypox symptoms you must not ignore

    MONKEYPOX is spreading in the UK and Brits are being told to stay alert to the symptoms.

    The virus is not new, having been endemic in parts of Africa for decades. 

    These reports, together with the list of symptoms compiled by the UKHSA, helps build a picture of how monkeypox presents.

    The signs may include:

    1. Fever
    2. Headache
    3. Muscle aches
    4. Backache
    5. Chills
    6. Exhaustion
    7. Night sweats
    8. Cold-like symptoms, such as congestion and runny nose
    9. Swollen lymph nodes
    10. Swollen groin
    11. Rash

    Complications of the illness were documented as:

    1. Low mood
    2. Severe pain
    3. Conjunctivitis
  • How YOU can protect yourself as UK cases soar

    WHO has also advised that anyone who comes into someone who has suspected or confirmed monkeypox must reduce their risk of getting it by limiting contact.

    This includes both parties wearing a face mask, avoiding skin-to-skin contact whenever possible, and using disposable gloves if you have any direct contact with lesions.

    It is advisable to practice good hand hygiene, especially after coming into contact with infected — or suspected infected —animals or humans.

    Regularly clean your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub, especially after contact with the person who is infected, their clothes, bed sheets, towels and other items or surfaces they have touched or that might have come into contact with their rash or respiratory secretions (e.g., utensils, dishes). 

  • Combating the spread

    In order to combat the spread, health chiefs today announced they had procured 20,000 doses of a safe smallpox vaccine called Imvanex, supplied by Bavarian Nordic to contain the infections.

    At present, anyone who has been in contact with someone who has caught the infection will be given a dose.

    Anyone who has the bug has to isolate and Brits have been told to be aware of the key signs when it comes to infection.

    Dr Susan Hopkins, Chief Medical Adviser, UKHSA, said: “We are continuing to promptly identify further Monkeypox cases in England through our extensive surveillance and contact tracing networks, our vigilant NHS services, and thanks to people coming forward with symptoms.

    “If anyone suspects they might have rashes or lesions on any part of their body, particularly if they have recently had a new sexual partner, they should limit their contact with others and contact NHS 111 or their local sexual health service as soon as possible, though please phone ahead before attending in person.”

  • A mild illness which gets better with time

    Monkeypox is a mild illness which gets better with time, in very rare cases it can lead to death.

    It’s most prevalent in parts of west or central Africa, but cases have now been detected globally.

    Initial symptoms are usually “non-specific” and are like a viral illness, medics say.

    A chickenpox-type rash later spreads across parts of the body.

    The rash usually affects the face, hands and arms, but can spread to genital areas.

  • UK monkeypox cases rise to 78

    Seven more cases of monkeypox were identified in England yesterday, health officials have said.

    The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) said that this brings new cases in the UK to a total of 78 since May 7.

    Among these cases, 77 were identified in England and one case has been reported in Scotland.

    As of May 24, no cases had been identified in Wales or Northern Ireland.

  • The UK’s small outbreak of Monkeypox

    THE UK has seen a small outbreak of monkeypox – but many people still don’t know much about the virus.

    The mystery outbreaks, starting in May 2022, are concerning health leaders. However, the threat to the public is still considered low.

    While monkeypox is a mild illness which gets better with time, in very rare cases it can lead to death. About six per cent of cases are fatal, the World Health Organization (WHO) says.

    One world health leader has said sex occurring at two raves in Europe could be behind the mystery monkeypox outbreaks. 

    Professor David Heymann, who formerly headed WHO’s emergencies department, said the leading theory “was sexual transmission among gay and bisexual men at two raves held in Spain and Belgium”, AP reported.

    Dr Heymann said it is one hypothesis among many, and added it’s known that monkeypox can spread when there is close contact with the lesions of someone who is infected, “and it looks like sexual contact has now amplified that transmission”.

    Monkeypox is not known as a sexually transmitted infection (STI), but it can be passed on by direct contact during sex, possibly through contaminated items such as bed linen, clothing and towels.

  • Where did monkeypox come from?

    Monkeypox is a rare viral infection most common in remote parts of Central and West Africa.

    But outbreaks in Britain, Portugal, Spain and the United States, have triggered alarm among public health experts.

    According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the name monkeypox originates from the initial discovery of the virus in monkeys in a Danish laboratory in 1958.

    The first human case was identified in a child in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1970.

  • ‘I survived the last US monkeypox outbreak – here are the warning symptoms’

    A MONKEYPOX survivor is sharing his experience with the virus as an increasing number of states report suspected cases.

    Cases have now been confirmed in the US, United Kingdom, Portugal, and Italy, while potential cases are being investigated in Canada and Spain.

    Nearly 20 years ago, Wisconsin had its own outbreak and the new cases hold painful memories for survivor Dr Kurt Zaeske.

    Back in 2003, he was a veterinarian who came in contact with the virus from a prairie dog he was treating.

    “Within about 48 hours of my handling that specimen, I became ill,” he told local news outlet WISN.

    “I started developing a blister on my thumb that didn’t look right, didn’t act right,” he said back in 2003, after being quarantined for two weeks.

    Read the article in full here.

  • Holiday warning as monkeypox hits favourite UK summer destination

    A BRITISH tourist staying at a favourite holiday hotspot in Spain is being tested for monkeypox.

    Health chiefs in the region confirmed the holidaymaker on the Canary Island of Fuerteventura was one of five suspected new cases currently being analysed.

    The age of the unnamed man, thought to be the first British tourist in Spain affected since the country announced its first cases last week, has not been revealed.

    A spokesman for the Canary Islands’ Health Service confirmed in a short statement: “A suspected case of monkeypox in Fuerteventura corresponds to a British tourist.”

    It is not yet known when they will confirm whether he has the disease.

    Authorities have not said if he is holidaying alone on the island or relaxing with relatives who are also being tested.

    Spain has so far confirmed around 40 cases of monkeypox and said another 67 people are being tested.

  • Expert warning monkeypox could become ‘permanent’ if PETS get it

    EXPERTS have warned monkeypox could become permanent in Europe if pets start catching it too.

    There have still not been any reports of monkeypox in pets, but in a rapid risk assessment on Monday, the European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC) said it was important to “manage exposed pets and prevent the disease from being transmitted to wildlife”.

    Issuing the update, the ECDC said: “If human-to-animal transmission occurs, and the virus spreads in an animal population, there is a risk that the disease could become endemic in Europe.

    “Rodents, and particularly species of the family of Sciuridae (squirrels) are likely to be suitable hosts, more so than humans, and transmission from humans to (pet) animals is theoretically possible.

    “Such a spill-over event could potentially lead to the virus establishing in European wildlife and the disease becoming an endemic zoonosis. The probability of this spill-over event is very low.”

    Prof David Robertson, of the Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, told the Telegraph this was a “valid concern”.

    He said: “It would seem sensible to monitor any animals/pets that infected people are in contact with.”

    Experts believe rodents, such as rats and squirrels, can harbour the virus but the full range of animals at risk is not yet known.

  • Portugal confirms nine new cases, total now 58

    Spain’s neighbour Portugal confirmed nine new infections on Thursday, bringing the total to 58.

    Portugal’s health authority DGS said the country was taking steps to establish a vaccine reserve through the European mechanism and was considering vaccinating the contacts of confirmed cases and health professionals.

  • Spain’s Monkeypox tally rises to 84

    Spanish health authorities have today reported 25 new cases of monkeypox.

    The new figure brings the total tally of infections in one of the main hot spots of the recent outbreak to 84.

    The Health Ministry, which now considers all non-human-origin pox infections as monkeypox after a positive test while before only counting those confirmed by sequencing, also said there were 73 suspected cases.

    Minister of Health Carolina Darias on Wednesday said Spain would buy monkeypox vaccines as part of the EU joint vaccine purchases and confirmed that the west African strain, which has a fatality rate in about 1% of cases, was the one detected in Spain.

    Spain, England and Portugal are the countries with the most cases in the recent outbreak of the usually mild viral disease outside its endemic areas in parts of west and central Africa.

  • Overall risk to population ‘remains low’ says UKHSA

    Despite the rise in cases, the UKHSA has said the risk to the overall UK population “remains low”.

    Gay, bisexual and men who have sex with men are being urged in particular to be aware of symptoms, especially if they have recently had a new sexual partner.

    UKHSA teams have been tracing contacts of those with a confirmed case and are advising those at highest risk to isolate for 21 days.

    A smallpox vaccine is also being offered to close contacts to reduce their risk of symptoms and severe illness.

  • Wales and NI confirm first Monkeypox cases

    The monkeypox virus has now been identified across the UK with the first recorded cases in Wales and Northern Ireland.

    Health officials in Wales confirmed their first case on Thursday morning, before the Public Health Agency in Northern Ireland later confirmed a case.

    Dr Giri Shankar, director of health protection for Public Health Wales, said: “We are working with the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), Public Health Scotland, and Public Health Agency Northern Ireland, and we are ready to respond to cases of monkeypox in Wales.

    “The case is being managed appropriately. To protect patient confidentiality, no further details relating to the patient will be disclosed.

    “Everyone is being asked to be aware of the monkeypox symptoms, but it is important that gay and bisexual men are alert as it’s believed to be spreading in sexual networks.

    “Anyone with unusual rashes or lesions on any part of their body should contact NHS 111 or call a sexual health service if they have concerns.”

    There are now believed to be 79 cases of monkeypox in the UK.

  • The UK’s small outbreak of Monkeypox

    THE UK has seen a small outbreak of monkeypox – but many people still don’t know much about the virus.

    The mystery outbreaks, starting in May 2022, are concerning health leaders. However, the threat to the public is still considered low.

    While monkeypox is a mild illness which gets better with time, in very rare cases it can lead to death. About six per cent of cases are fatal, the World Health Organization (WHO) says.

    One world health leader has said sex occurring at two raves in Europe could be behind the mystery monkeypox outbreaks. 

    Professor David Heymann, who formerly headed WHO’s emergencies department, said the leading theory “was sexual transmission among gay and bisexual men at two raves held in Spain and Belgium”, AP reported.

    Dr Heymann said it is one hypothesis among many, and added it’s known that monkeypox can spread when there is close contact with the lesions of someone who is infected, “and it looks like sexual contact has now amplified that transmission”.

    Monkeypox is not known as a sexually transmitted infection (STI), but it can be passed on by direct contact during sex, possibly through contaminated items such as bed linen, clothing and towels.

  • Where did monkeypox come from?

    Monkeypox is a rare viral infection most common in remote parts of Central and West Africa.

    But outbreaks in Britain, Portugal, Spain and the United States, have triggered alarm among public health experts.

    According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the name monkeypox originates from the initial discovery of the virus in monkeys in a Danish laboratory in 1958.

    The first human case was identified in a child in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1970.

  • Monkeypox patients could be infectious WEEKS after recovery

    SEVERE monkeypox patients may be infectious for up to ten weeks, scientists fear.

    An investigation of previous patients who had the disease found one man tested positive more than 70 days after he first showed symptoms.

    It comes as cases of the virus reach 71 in the UK, and health officials have urged people to stay alert to symptoms.

    Signs of the disease in the early stages include fever, headache, chills, back and muscle aches.

    Patients are contagious until their scabs fall off, the UK Health and Security Agency (UKHSA) says, and the scabs themselves can contain viral material.

    However, the latest study, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, suggests people may be infectious long after their rash has settled.

    Study author Dr Hugh Adler, from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, said: “It remains positive in the throat and blood for the length of the illness and maybe even longer after the rash is resolved. 

    “We don’t know that this means these patients are more infectious or infectious for longer, but it does inform us of the biology of disease.”

  • ‘I survived the last US monkeypox outbreak – here are the warning symptoms’

    A MONKEYPOX survivor is sharing his experience with the virus as an increasing number of states report suspected cases.

    Cases have now been confirmed in the US, United Kingdom, Portugal, and Italy, while potential cases are being investigated in Canada and Spain.

    Nearly 20 years ago, Wisconsin had its own outbreak and the new cases hold painful memories for survivor Dr Kurt Zaeske.

    Back in 2003, he was a veterinarian who came in contact with the virus from a prairie dog he was treating.

    “Within about 48 hours of my handling that specimen, I became ill,” he told local news outlet WISN.

    “I started developing a blister on my thumb that didn’t look right, didn’t act right,” he said back in 2003, after being quarantined for two weeks.

    Read the article in full here.

  • UK monkeypox case tally rises to 90

    Eight more cases of monkeypox have been identified in England, health officials said, as the first cases of the virus were recorded in Wales and Northern Ireland.

    The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) said the new cases bring the England total since May 7 to 85, and the UK total to 90.

    Health officials in Wales confirmed their first case on Thursday morning, before the Public Health Agency in Northern Ireland later confirmed a case.

    Two further cases were confirmed in Scotland, Public Health Scotland said, bringing the number of cases north of the border to three.

    People with unusual rashes or lesions, particularly if they have had a new sexual partner, have been urged to limit their contact with others and contact NHS 111 or their local sexual health clinic.

    Dr Susan Hopkins, UKHSA chief medical adviser, said: “We are continuing to promptly identify further monkeypox cases in England through our extensive surveillance and contact tracing networks, our vigilant NHS services, and thanks to people coming forward with symptoms.”

  • ‘I survived the last US monkeypox outbreak – here are the warning symptoms’

    A MONKEYPOX survivor is sharing his experience with the virus as an increasing number of states report suspected cases.

    Cases have now been confirmed in the US, United Kingdom, Portugal, and Italy, while potential cases are being investigated in Canada and Spain.

    Nearly 20 years ago, Wisconsin had its own outbreak and the new cases hold painful memories for survivor Dr Kurt Zaeske.

    Back in 2003, he was a veterinarian who came in contact with the virus from a prairie dog he was treating.

    “Within about 48 hours of my handling that specimen, I became ill,” he told local news outlet WISN.

    “I started developing a blister on my thumb that didn’t look right, didn’t act right,” he said back in 2003, after being quarantined for two weeks.

    Read the article in full here.

  • The UK’s small outbreak of Monkeypox

    THE UK has seen a small outbreak of monkeypox – but many people still don’t know much about the virus.

    The mystery outbreaks, starting in May 2022, are concerning health leaders. However, the threat to the public is still considered low.

    While monkeypox is a mild illness which gets better with time, in very rare cases it can lead to death. About six per cent of cases are fatal, the World Health Organization (WHO) says.

    One world health leader has said sex occurring at two raves in Europe could be behind the mystery monkeypox outbreaks. 

    Professor David Heymann, who formerly headed WHO’s emergencies department, said the leading theory “was sexual transmission among gay and bisexual men at two raves held in Spain and Belgium”, AP reported.

    Dr Heymann said it is one hypothesis among many, and added it’s known that monkeypox can spread when there is close contact with the lesions of someone who is infected, “and it looks like sexual contact has now amplified that transmission”.

    Monkeypox is not known as a sexually transmitted infection (STI), but it can be passed on by direct contact during sex, possibly through contaminated items such as bed linen, clothing and towels.

  • Holiday warning as monkeypox hits favourite UK summer destination

    A BRITISH tourist staying at a favourite holiday hotspot in Spain is being tested for monkeypox.

    Health chiefs in the region confirmed the holidaymaker on the Canary Island of Fuerteventura was one of five suspected new cases currently being analysed.

    The age of the unnamed man, thought to be the first British tourist in Spain affected since the country announced its first cases last week, has not been revealed.

    A spokesman for the Canary Islands’ Health Service confirmed in a short statement: “A suspected case of monkeypox in Fuerteventura corresponds to a British tourist.”

    It is not yet known when they will confirm whether he has the disease.

    Authorities have not said if he is holidaying alone on the island or relaxing with relatives who are also being tested.

    Spain has so far confirmed around 40 cases of monkeypox and said another 67 people are being tested.

  • Expert warning monkeypox could become ‘permanent’ if PETS get it

    EXPERTS have warned monkeypox could become permanent in Europe if pets start catching it too.

    There have still not been any reports of monkeypox in pets, but in a rapid risk assessment on Monday, the European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC) said it was important to “manage exposed pets and prevent the disease from being transmitted to wildlife”.

    Issuing the update, the ECDC said: “If human-to-animal transmission occurs, and the virus spreads in an animal population, there is a risk that the disease could become endemic in Europe.

    “Rodents, and particularly species of the family of Sciuridae (squirrels) are likely to be suitable hosts, more so than humans, and transmission from humans to (pet) animals is theoretically possible.

    “Such a spill-over event could potentially lead to the virus establishing in European wildlife and the disease becoming an endemic zoonosis. The probability of this spill-over event is very low.”

    Prof David Robertson, of the Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, told the Telegraph this was a “valid concern”.

    He said: “It would seem sensible to monitor any animals/pets that infected people are in contact with.”

    Experts believe rodents, such as rats and squirrels, can harbour the virus but the full range of animals at risk is not yet known.

  • Portugal confirms nine new cases, total now 58

    Spain’s neighbour Portugal confirmed nine new infections on Thursday, bringing the total to 58.

    Portugal’s health authority DGS said the country was taking steps to establish a vaccine reserve through the European mechanism and was considering vaccinating the contacts of confirmed cases and health professionals.

  • Spain’s Monkeypox tally rises to 84

    Spanish health authorities have today reported 25 new cases of monkeypox.

    The new figure brings the total tally of infections in one of the main hot spots of the recent outbreak to 84.

    The Health Ministry, which now considers all non-human-origin pox infections as monkeypox after a positive test while before only counting those confirmed by sequencing, also said there were 73 suspected cases.

    Minister of Health Carolina Darias on Wednesday said Spain would buy monkeypox vaccines as part of the EU joint vaccine purchases and confirmed that the west African strain, which has a fatality rate in about 1% of cases, was the one detected in Spain.

    Spain, England and Portugal are the countries with the most cases in the recent outbreak of the usually mild viral disease outside its endemic areas in parts of west and central Africa.





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