London tube strike today – Travel chaos as workers hold 24-hour walkout over jobs & pensions; plus TfL status updates


TUBE stations are closed today due to strike action – meaning travel chaos for those returning to work after the Bank Holiday break.

London Underground advised people not to travel, warning of severe disruption across the network from the start of service on Monday to 8am on Tuesday.

Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) are taking industrial action in a dispute over jobs and pensions.

Transport for London (TfL) said some train services will run but many stations, especially those in central and south London, will be closed, while others may only open for limited periods.

Other TfL services, including DLR, London Overground and Trams, are not affected by the industrial action and will be running but will be busier.

TfL said no proposals have been tabled on pensions or terms and conditions, and nobody will lose their jobs because of the proposals it has set out.

As part of previous funding agreements, the Government has required TfL to work towards achieving financial sustainability on its operations by April 2023.

Read our Tube strikes live blog below for the latest updates…

  • Strike action is ‘regrettable’ says business group leader

    Anneka Hendrick, the director of the CBI business group, said: “Strike action is particularly regrettable at a time when the economy is under such strain, so constructive dialogue to avert industrial action continues to be a priority.

    “While many workplaces have already struck a balance between home and office working, those which rely on the tube network will need to demonstrate even greater short-term flexibility.”

  • Passengers were warned to avoid tube this morning

    London Underground advised people not to travel on tubes this morning because of a strike by thousands of workers in a dispute over jobs and pensions.

    Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) will walk out for 24 hours, crippling Tube services across the capital.

    Transport for London (TfL) said some train services will run but it expects severe disruption across the network from the start of service on Monday to 8am on Tuesday.

    Many stations, especially those in central and south London, will be closed, while stations that can be opened may only operate for limited periods.

  • Commuters struggling to get to work

    Commuters said they were struggling to get to work due to transport “chaos” caused by Tube strikes.

    Some 4,000 members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union who work at London stations were expected to strike for 24 hours from Monday morning in a dispute over jobs and pensions.

    At Paddington station at about 7.40am, construction worker Miguel Basantes, 54, said he needed to get to work in Hampstead, adding: “It is chaos.

    “In Liverpool Street there was crowds of people and I was waiting for 20 or 30 minutes.

    “I don’t know how to get to work.”

    Indian restaurant worker Kundan Darla, 25, said: “I think it is bad, I am too late for work.”

    On the 18 bus near Euston station, Josie, 26, who did not give her surname, said: “I was under the impression they were on quite a good pension scheme, earning really well.”

  • London businesses ‘disappointed’ by RMT strike action

    Richard Burge, chief executive of the London Chamber of Commerce said: “We are extremely disappointed that the RMT has called for a mass walkout by TfL workers in such close proximity to the Queen’s Jubilee Weekend when London will be full of visitors.

    “The last two years hit London disproportionately hard and the capital is desperately trying to claw back some sense of normality after a tumultuous two years.

    “This strike now puts TfL in a position of having to recommend that Londoners work from home.

    “Ultimately, this will only harm London’s economy and it is time for TfL to sort out their dispute with the RMT so we can get back to building prosperity and showing the world that London is open business.”

  • Waterloo passengers SLAM ‘inaccurate’ information

    Commuters at Waterloo Station have been left confused by advice on the Transport for London website about today’s Tube strike.

    The TfL website advises travellers to travel between 8am and 6pm on Monday. However, it also warns that many stations will be closed throughout the day.

    The entrance to Waterloo underground station remained closed as of 8.10am.

    William, a commuter from south-west London, said that while he did not agree with the strike, the information given out could have been more accurate. He believed that he would be able to travel from 8am.

    “I just wish they had put the correct information up”, he said.

    “Personally, I don’t agree with the strikes as they stand anyway. However, if they are striking and they’ve gone through the correct process to do it, it’s out of my control. Then the information online should be the correct information that allows people to plan their journey.”

  • Frustrated commuters tell of their anger at shut Waterloo underground station

    Frustrated commuters have gathered around the entrance to Waterloo underground station after the Tube was shut by a strike.

    One commuter, Charlotte from Surbiton, said she was unsure if she would be able to complete her journey to Canary Wharf.

    “We’ll see if anything opens up, and I’ll go home if it doesn’t”, she said.

    “I’m pretty sure everyone will be delayed coming in today.”

    She said she had been traveling for almost an hour already, adding that she didn’t feel like the strike was justified.

    “I don’t necessarily see the reason for the strike”, she said.

    “It doesn’t necessarily feel like it’s justified to cause this much disruption, especially when London is getting up and running again. It seems like a big setback for the city.”

  • TfL apoloogises for impact of today’s strike

    Andy Lord, TfL’s chief operating officer, said: “I’d like to apologise to London for the impact this strike will have on journeys.

    “We know it’s going to be damaging to London and the economy, at a time when public transport is playing a crucial role in the capital’s recovery.

    “While our focus is always on helping everyone travel around London whenever they want, the expected impact of the RMT’s action means we have to advise people to only travel if necessary, as many stations may be closed.

    “Alternatives to the Tube, including the bus and rail networks, are likely to be much busier than usual and we expect the severe disruption caused by this strike to continue into the morning of Tuesday June 7.

    “No changes have been proposed to pensions and nobody has or will lose their job as a result of the proposals we have set out.

    “Working with us to find a resolution is the best course of action, avoiding the disruption this strike will cause to Londoners and the economy.”

  • DLR and Overground services still running

    Transport for London (TfL) said some train services will run but many stations, especially those in central and south London, will be closed, while others may only open for limited periods.

    Other TfL services, including DLR, London Overground and Trams, are not affected by the industrial action and will be running but will be busier.

    TfL said no proposals have been tabled on pensions or terms and conditions, and nobody will lose their jobs because of the proposals it has set out.

  • TfL maps to help you plan an alternative journey

    Here’s a selection of TfL maps.

    They can help you plan your walking or cycling journey around central London:

  • Which underground lines are affected by today’s strikes?

    The following lines are not providing services this morning:

    • – Bakerloo line
    • – Circle line
    • – District line
    • – Hammersmith & City line
    • – Metropolitan line
    • – Picadilly line
    • – Victoria line
    • – Waterloo & City line

    Other lines will also be affected, including:

    • – The Central Line will run between White City and West Ruislip/Ealing Broadway. A reduced service will also run between Epping and Stratford via Woodford and Hainault
    • – The Jubilee Line will run between Finchley Road and Stanmore, though some stations will remain closed
    • – The Northern Line will operate between Edgware and Golders Green, East Finchley and High Barnet and between Finchley Central and Mill Hill East. Some stations will remain closed.
  • Elizabeth Line is still running

    The newly opened Elizabeth Line is still open and running trains.

    Services will run normally but will be busier than usual.

    TfL also advises passengers to allow more time for journeys and consider alternatives.

    If you are using National Rail and other TfL services from stations also served by London Underground, check before you travel for possible station closures.

  • Walking and cycling are good options

    Londoners are never more than 600m away from a Santander Cycle hire point in the centre of the capital.

    Meanwhile Brompton Bike Hire are offering free bike hire at their docks across London.

    Many parts of Zone 1 are walkable and people are advised to walk or cycle where possible.

    Walking and cycle maps of the West End and the City of London can be downloaded from the TfL website.

  • Advice on travelling to Heathrow Airport

    The London Tube strike means most routes into Heathrow Airport will be closed off.

    Passengers travelling to Heathrow are advised to use TfL Rail services as an alternative to the Piccadilly line where possible.

  • Use of electric scooters

    In light of the Tube Strike, there are alternative ways you can use to travel around London.

    Some boroughs offer electric scooters to rent, which is the only way to legally ride one in London.

    These areas are Camden, City of London, Ealing, Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Lambeth, Richmond upon Thames, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and Westminster.

  • Party is over for millions of Jubilee Bank Holiday revellers

    The party is over for millions of people who joined in with Platinum Jubilee celebrations across the extended bank holiday weekend.

    Closing the four days of pomp, pageantry and partying, the Queen said she remains “committed to serving” the nation to “the best of my ability”.

    The 96-year-old monarch was absent for much of the celebrations, appearing in person for just over 27 minutes throughout the weekend.

    Delighting thousands of people packed on to The Mall, the Queen stepped out on to the balcony on Sunday evening following the Platinum Pageant, which told the story of her life, and the nation, with an eccentric, fun and imaginative carnival-like display.

    She was flanked by her three heirs – son, grandson and great-grandson – offering a glimpse into the monarchy’s future.

  • Londoners share their misery as strikes bring chaos to capital

    A 24-hour strike has hit Londons tube network this morning, with action set to take place until 8am Tuesday.

    And Londoners are venting their frustrations on social media.

    One disgruntled traveler said: “Tube strike makes me realise I took my commute for granted.”

    Meanwhile, another blasted: “Very wet morning in London and now stuck on a bus due to the tube strike. What fun.”

  • TfL says no proposals tabled on pensions

    TfL said no proposals have been tabled on pensions or terms and conditions, and nobody will lose their jobs because of the proposals it has set out.

    As part of previous funding agreements, the Government has required TfL to work towards achieving financial sustainability on its operations by April 2023.

    TfL has proposed not recruiting into around 500 to 600 posts as they become vacant.

  • ‘Toxic’ strike action on London Underground

    Commuters complained of the ‘toxic’ strike action on the London Underground as they faced long delays.

    They took to Twitter to describe the stressed of traffic growing on the roads and buses crawling along.

    One wrote: “In solid traffic already not gonna last long today.”

    Another said: “It’s disgusting. They earn more money than any of the British public services or frontline jobs. And yet again they strike and bringing chaos/financial difficulty to the whole of London.”

  • What should commuters do?

    Commuters should always check and plan their journey before they leave for their commute to see whether the lines are heavily affected.

    You can check our blog for the latest updates and news.

    You can also use the Official TFL website to check for closures and disruption.

  • In picture: RMT workers hold picket line outside London Bridge station

    A 24-hour tube strike is affecting London this morning.

    Delays and cancellations are expected through to 8am on Tuesday morning.

    The image below shows RMT union members at a picket line outside London Bridge Underground Station at around 7am this morning.

    Transport for London has advised the public to avoid travelling on the Underground network today due to a walkout by members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport Union over proposals for 600 job losses.

    Credit: LNP
  • TFL tweets of disruption to London tube network

    Transport for London tweeted: “A strike by station staff is planned across the Tube network on Monday 6 June.

    “We will keep as many stations as possible open, but we expect that this strike will cause severe disruption and the closure of many Tube stations.”

  • Walking and cycling are good options

    Londoners are never more than 600m away from a Santander Cycle hire point in the centre of the capital.

    Meanwhile Brompton Bike Hire are offering free bike hire at their docks across London.

    Many parts of Zone 1 are walkable and people are advised to walk or cycle where possible.

    Walking and cycle maps of the West End and the City of London can be downloaded from the TfL website.

  • Advice on travelling around London

    Here are some tips from Transport for London (TfL):

    • Allow extra time to complete your journey
    • Consider walking or cycling, as other lines and services are likely to be busier as people seek alternative routes 
    • Follow our safer travel guidance throughout the strike
    • Check status updates before you travel
  • The history of the night tube

    The first lines to take on the 24-hour service were the Central and Victoria lines on August 19, 2016.

    Central line services run between Ealing Broadway and Loughton/Hainault while the entire Victoria line stays open.

    Services were then launched on the Northern line and the Piccadilly line joined the network.

    And in July, 2017, it was announced the London Overground, also referred to as the Orange Line, will operate all night on Friday and Saturdays between New Cross Gate and Dalston Junction – with the service to then be extended to Highbury & Islington in 2018.

    The Northern line ran a 24-hour from Morden via Camden Town and on to Edgeware/High Barnet with no service on the Bank or Mill Hill East branches.

    Piccadilly line ran between Cockfosters and Heathrow Terminal 5 with no services on the Terminal 4 loop or between Uxbridge and Acton Town.

  • Londoners advised not to travel this morning

    London Underground advised people not to travel, warning of severe disruption across the network from the start of service on Monday to 8am on Tuesday.

    Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) are taking industrial action in a dispute over jobs and pensions.

    Transport for London (TfL) said some train services will run but many stations, especially those in central and south London, will be closed, while others may only open for limited periods.





Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.