Gov. Hochul signs law banning guns in many public places in New York


NEW YORK — Guns will be banned in many public places in New York now that Gov. Kathy Hochul signed a law that she says gives the state more ammunition in the fight against gun violence.

State lawmakers claim they were forced to pass the new law after the Supreme Court struck down New York’s restrictive gun licensing laws, which opens the door for many concealed carry guns on our streets.

READ MORE: New York lawmakers approve gun control legislation in special session after Supreme Court decisions

Times Square is declared one of the “sensitive places” in New York state’s new gun safety law, meaning the public cannot carry guns there.

Firearms are banned in other crowded public places, including:

  • Bars,
  • Theaters,
  • Stadiums,
  • Museums,
  • Casinos,
  • Polling places,
  • Parks,
  • And mass transit.

“If I had a license to carry, I would want to carry in the subway,” said retired NYPD detective Michael Alcazar, an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Alcazar told CBS2’s Dave Carlin he likes that the law requires more training for people getting gun licenses, but he says the list of locations may need to be reconsidered.

“It seems like she’s more concerned about law-abiding citizens and limiting their carry options, the locations,” he said. “She doesn’t want guns in the subway, she doesn’t want guns in Times Square, so law-abiding citizens won’t carry the guns, but then the bad guys will be carrying the guns.”

This is New York’s response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling overturning the state’s century-old concealed carry law.

The law says people will not be allowed to take guns into any business or workplace unless the owners put up signs saying guns are welcome.

One such sign is already posted inside the Corner Café on Ditmas Avenue in Borough Park, Brooklyn.

People applying for a license to carry a handgun in New York state also have to provide four character references. Gun buyers must also complete firearms safety training, agree to periodic background checks and submit social media accounts for review.

“I think people should have a gun safety class, at least, and that they should have character references,” Poughkeepsie resident Monica Church said.

“I’m a second amendment believer,” said Adam Davis, a tourist from Georgia. “There should be background checks, certainly, but I’m all for keeping guns right now.”

Gun advocates say the law tramples rights upheld by the Supreme Court and they say a legal challenge is certain.



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